Letters to the Editor

Yes on 100

African elephants and rhinos may seem far away, but Measure 100 is a way to help protect them. Poaching endangered animal parts is big business, and a cruel one. Among illegally trafficked goods, only drugs, weapons, and human trafficking generate larger dollar volumes worldwide.

Vote Yes on 100

When Oregonians hear that elephants, rhinos and other non-native animals are victims of a mass poaching crisis, referred to as “wildlife genocide,” many think it is a problem that is worlds away. But Measure 100 reveals the shocking truth that poaching is driven by the demand for an animal’s parts and products, such as elephant ivory, and that wildlife trafficking is right in our own backyards because the demand in Oregon exists and we are the only West Coast state that has not enacted strict measures to prevent or combat it.

Pass measure 100 to save animals

As a Bend resident and veterinarian I will be voting in support of Measure 100. If passed, this measure will outlaw the sale of parts and products of 12 species of endangered exotic animals within Oregon.

Since the health and welfare of all animals is a priority to veterinarians, many veterinarians in Oregon have endorsed this measure, including Oregon U.S. Rep. Kurt Schrader.

Protect animals with Measure 100

Oregonians love animals, and we have a long, proud history of passing laws to protect them. That’s why among all 50 states, Oregon is ranked second in the strength of its animal welfare laws. Now we have a chance to continue that tradition by passing Measure 100 to ban the commercial trade in the parts and products of our most cherished and iconic wildlife species.

Yes on measure 100

Oregonians love animals and we have a long, proud history of passing laws to protect them. That’s why among all 50 states, Oregon is ranked second in strength of its animal welfare laws. 

Now we have a chance to continue that tradition by passing Measure 100 to ban the commercial trade in the parts and products of our most cherished and iconic wildlife species.

Vote yes on Measure 100

I am Kenyan citizen and earned my LLM in Animal Law from Lewis & Clark Law School in Portland, and now work with a nonprofit in Kenya that saves elephants and rhinos from the poachers and smugglers. Its operations have a finger on the pulse of wildlife crime, and with it comes the realization that without demand reduction initiatives like Measure 100, we will never win this war against illegal wildlife crimes.

Measure to protect endangered animals

Oregonians love animals, and we have a long, proud history of passing laws to protect them. That’s why among all 50 states, Oregon is ranked second in the strength of its animal welfare laws. Now we have a chance to continue that tradition by passing Measure 100 to ban the commercial trade in the parts and products of our most cherished and iconic wildlife species.

Sad that Measure 100 necessary

The Register-Guard’s Sept. 29 editorial, “Help end a gruesome trade,” was informative and awareness-raising. It saddens me that there even exists the tragedy that necessitates Measure 100 and the editorial to promote it.

Protect wildlife

This fall, Oregon has a chance to play a big role in the global fight against wildlife trafficking. In 2015, voters in Washington state passed a landmark measure to ban the trade of products from 10 wildlife species, including elephants, rhinos, several big cats and marine creatures like sea turtles and rays. California in 2015, passed a ban on ivory and rhino horn in its state legislature, and Hawaii followed suit this year.

End traffic in endangered species

Since January, I’ve spent a few hours every weekend collecting signatures for the Save Endangered Animals Oregon ballot measure, which would prohibit the sale of products and parts from sea turtles, sharks, rays, elephants, rhinos, cheetahs and other critically threatened or endangered species.

By the end, I had collected nearly 1,500 signatures in the Eugene area. 

I found it amazing how universally supported this measure is among Oregon voters.